SKILLS YOU GAIN WHILE WRITING YOUR ESSAYS

There are many people who continue to feel that the whole educational system is just a scam. How they reached that conclusion still continues to puzzle many; but with the rise of school dropout millionaires, it is not all surprising. Part of what they see as a scam in the whole system is the requirement of students to learn things that they never get to apply, throughout their lives.

Interestingly, many students have always wondered why they are even required to write long and perhaps boring essays at school, especially when they do not have any interest in writing. While it is okay to assume that this all part of the conspiracy, it may be worthwhile to identify useful skills that you gain while writing your essays.

You learn to write

The most important thing you learn from writing essays is that you gradually have your writing skills developed. This means that you learn how to construct sentences; how to effectively use punctuations, and even spellings. These are things that you will surely find useful throughout your life. There is any hardly anyone that would argue that learning how to produce a written report with essential ingredients like an introduction, a body, and a conclusion are not useful skills to have. Having said this, we shall look out other equally important reasons why you might need to take your essay writing more seriously.

You learn to argue

When we actually say you need to learn how to argue, that should really sound weird. The reason for this is that nearly everyone knows how to do that, and if you are more observant you would actually see people arguing over the latest football match in your vicinity, or you might find two neighbors constantly locking horns on petty issues. But that is not what we mean. We are actually talking about the ability to develop powerful arguments on topical issues. This entails presenting points in a coherent and very logical manner; and the ability to persuade others through clever argumentation.

You learn to research

Furthermore, writing essays teaches you how to do a simple research—you can rest assured that not many people have this skill. By writing essays, you learn to make comparisons, inferences, and deductions. While it is true that this will surely help you in getting a good grade on your assignment, it could prove to be very useful when you go shopping. In case you are wondering if you really want to learn to do research, then you should know that it would be difficult to avoid it—as it the need would always arise even beyond the academic circle.

You learn to be objective

Have you ever had a conversation with someone in which you seriously wanted to see beyond their biases?

I can only guess the feeling was not a pleasant one. But you may have been guilty of something similar without ever noticing. The point is that when you write essays, your worldview is expanded, little by little. This may be sufficient to rid you of certain prejudices and biases.

Most of the time, in writing an essay, you draw information from a wide range of sources and as such, you are able to make an objective comparison of the different ideas of different authors. You sure want to objectively criticize the government, your spouse, kids, etc.; and this is just what you learn from writing essays.

Flexibility

Don’t forget that many of the topics you may have asked to write on have not always been your favorites, but that is an essential part of writing essays. By writing on subjects that are not familiar to you, you become flexible; and would, therefore, find it easy to adapt to different situations. Finally, it is already obvious that there are lots of things you learn while studying how to write essays. Some are of immediate value, others are for the future.

 

Is an Online Education Right for Me?

Many prospective professional students may be wary of the online learning format. Will my education be of the same quality as the education offered at a ground school? Will I be able to learn as well with the online learning format versus the face-to-face learning offered at a campus-based university? These are important questions to ask yourself when thinking of pursuing an online degree. The fact is, online learning is more representative of the realities of an increasingly distanced workforce than the lecture halls and predetermined class schedules of a ground school. Online education works proactively in order to cater to the working student while offering them the equivalent of the educational experience found at a ground school without the hassle.

ONLINE LEARNING MAY BE RIGHT FOR YOU IF:

You’re a student interested in earning your first degree while maintaining a demanding job or lifestyle.
You’re already a professional, have a full time job and responsibilities, but are looking for a way to earn an advanced degree or an additional degree within the framework of an already busy schedule.
You are goal-oriented and self-motivated, and prefer a self-paced learning style.
You possess excellent time-management skills.
You’re interested in sharpening your Web skills.
A technologically-based approach to higher education appeals to you.
You’re in need of a first degree or an additional degree in order to advance in a current career or be qualified for a different career.
You desire the convenience and flexibility that online courses offer, course material accessible 24/7, straightforward, Web-based contact with professors and fellow students.
Interacting with both geographically diverse students and professors appeals to you.
You dislike or don’t have time for the hassle of a daily there-and-back commute to a ground school campus.

ONLINE EDUCATION MAY BE CHALLENGING IF:

You desire an amount of social interaction equivalent to that of the “face-to-face” dynamic of a ground school, i.e., seeing your professor and fellow classmates each day or working cooperatively in a social atmosphere.
You are unsure of your level of self-motivation and may have difficulty completing assignments and studying without the presence of or direct contact with your professor, or prefer working within a group dynamic on a day-to-day basis as opposed to self-paced learning.
You require a good deal of structure as typically found in a classroom setting, with pre-determined class times, and a concrete daily class schedule.
You feel you may have inadequate computer skills, including navigating the internet, interacting via message boards, email, chat forums, computer conferencing, accessing multimedia, etc.